Loughborough Sports Massage

WHAT IS SPORTS MASSAGE?

Massage therapy is a long-term solution for muscle performance and injury rehabilitation and prevention. Successful treatment requires the skills of a professional therapist with results often starting to be noticeable after a couple of sessions. The time and resources spent on sports massage are worth it for the end results.

Sports massage improves muscle performance, enhances flexibility, and increases the athlete’s range of motion around the joints. Rigorous physical activity will also cause your muscles to tighten, which results in an ischemic reaction. This condition restricts the blood supply to the muscles. Getting a massage regularly will enhance the blood flow and transport nutrients to the muscles.

The benefits of sports massage go beyond the physiological. The strains of athletic training take their toll on the mind. Relaxation massage facilitates rest and better sleep. It can also help quiet the mind. Every session can leave the athlete refreshed, rejuvenated and ready to tackle the next round of training.

Sports Massage techniques

HOW SPORTS MASSAGE CAN HELP

The effect of sports massage depends on the type of technique used. During a deep tissue massage, the therapist uses a slow but firm pressure to reach deeper layers of the muscle and fascia, which penetrates and softens hard and tense muscles. Deep tissue massage is very popular with amateur and professional athletes.

Myofascial release can be confused with deep tissue massage. The fascia is the upper protective layer of muscle, which becomes hard and stiff with excessive use. Continued pressure applied during a myofascial release is used to relax the fascia. Massage oils aren’t normally used during a myofascial release so that the therapist can accurately feel the fascia fibres.

Other techniques used can include connective tissue lock (CTM lock) which is designed to work specifically on fascia, and soft tissue release (STR) which is administered by applying and maintaining a pressure, or ‘locking’ into the relevant tissues whilst simultaneously stretching away the aligning fibres. 

The ‘tools of the trade’ for sports massage techniques are the therapist’s fingers, thumbs, knuckles, forearms, elbows, reinforced thumbs and fingers. Friction techniques utilise the therapist’s thumbs and fingers, while compressions use the palm of the hands, elbows or forearms, often using deep longitudinal strokes. 

Athletes under rehabilitation care receive massages according to the type of injury. For example, patients with a rotator cuff injury only receive light massages when the swelling is evident and the pain is still fresh, to help increase blood flow. Deep tissue massages are administered when pain and swelling have decreased.

Sports Massage techniques

HOW SPORTS MASSAGE CAN HELP

The effect of sports massage depends on the type of technique used. During a deep tissue massage, the therapist uses a slow but firm pressure to reach deeper layers of the muscle and fascia, which penetrates and softens hard and tense muscles. Deep tissue massage is very popular with amateur and professional athletes.

Myofascial release can be confused with deep tissue massage. The fascia is the upper protective layer of muscle, which becomes hard and stiff with excessive use. Continued pressure applied during a myofascial release is used to relax the fascia. Massage oils aren’t normally used during a myofascial release so that the therapist can accurately feel the fascia fibres.

Other techniques used can include connective tissue lock (CTM lock) which is designed to work specifically on fascia, and soft tissue release (STR) which is administered by applying and maintaining a pressure, or ‘locking’ into the relevant tissues whilst simultaneously stretching away the aligning fibres. 

The ‘tools of the trade’ for sports massage techniques are the therapist’s fingers, thumbs, knuckles, forearms, elbows, reinforced thumbs and fingers. Friction techniques utilise the therapist’s thumbs and fingers, while compressions use the palm of the hands, elbows or forearms, often using deep longitudinal strokes. 

Athletes under rehabilitation care receive massages according to the type of injury. For example, patients with a rotator cuff injury only receive light massages when the swelling is evident and the pain is still fresh, to help increase blood flow. Deep tissue massages are administered when pain and swelling have decreased.

Video testimonials

Video testimonial by Jorge Wilkes, Triathlete Team GB.

Video testimonial by Louise Ferguson.

Video testimonial by Andreas Vazaios,
Competitive Swimmer, Team Greece.

Video Testimonial by British Competitive Swimmer
Lewis Burras. Team GB

 SPORTS MASSAGE PRICE LIST

We offer a 10% Discount for students

Take advantage of our block booking discount and save money!

Save £21 when you pay in advance for four 30 minute sports massage sessions - only £119. To book call 07784 910562

Cash payments, all major debit and credit cards, and bank transfers accepted.